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My Husbands Dietary Patterns Which May Have Lead to CKD

Today, I want to share a personal story with you about my husband’s journey with chronic kidney disease (CKD); about how his dietary patterns may have played a significant role in his development of CKD.

Were my husband's eating habits a factor in his diagnosis?

When he was diagnosed with CKD, it was a total shock to both of us. He lifts weights and works out. He thought he had been taking good care of himself by staying active. We both soon realized that his eating habits had been a major contributing factor.

You see we loved eating out and trying new restaurants. We both ate high-calorie food, processed snacks, and sugary drinks. He didn't realize how much damage it was doing to his body. And even when I did cook at home, I fixed gumbos,  fried foods, and jambalaya often relying on pre-packaged meals.

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Little did I know that these dietary patterns were putting a lot of stress on his kidneys and mine too. High levels of sodium, sugar, and processed foods can cause inflammation and damage to the kidneys. Of course this lead to CKD.

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But we are not alone in these struggles. Many people unknowingly put their kidney health at risk by following a diet high in sodium, sugar, and processed foods. It's easy to get caught up in the convenience and taste of these foods. The long-term consequences can be devastating.

Making changes to his diet

After his diagnosis, I knew I had to make some major changes to his diet. I wanted to improve his kidney function and prevent further damage.  I had already started eating healthy because of the health issues I have. It wasn't easy for him to change.  He looked the picture of health; muscles, flat stomach, broad shoulders, etc.  Looks can be deceiving. I started by cutting back on processed foods and having him eat more healthy meals at home with fresh, whole ingredients.

Veggies are an important part of any CKD diet. But be careful with high-potassium ones like spinach, kale, and broccoli. While they're packed with nutrients, they can be tough on your kidneys if you eat too much of them. So, it's all about moderation.

I also started paying more attention to his sodium intake, as too much sodium can lead to high blood pressure, which is a major risk factor for CKD. I began reading food labels and cooking with less salt, and I found that I could still enjoy flavorful meals without sacrificing taste.

When it comes to protein, it's best to stick to lean sources like chicken, fish, and tofu. Red meat, on the other hand, can be hard on your kidneys and should be eaten sparingly. As for carbs, I chose complex ones like whole grains, fruits, and veggies, which are easier on your kidneys than simple sugars.

Prioritizing our health

But the most important change I made was prioritizing our health over convenience or indulgence. He started noticing how certain foods made him feel and how his body responded to different dietary patterns. By being more mindful and intentional about both our food choices, I was able to make long-lasting changes to our diet and improve both our kidney health.

And finally, don't forget to stay hydrated. Drinking enough water is key to keeping our kidneys functioning properly. The good thing is that he was a water drinker already because of his exercise regimen.

Let his experience be a lesson to you. If you want to help prevent CKD or improve your kidney function, take a close look at your dietary patterns, and make changes where needed. Your body will thank you in the long run.

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In addition to chronic kidney disease, do you also live with diabetes?

This article represents the opinions, thoughts, and experiences of the author; none of this content has been paid for by any advertiser. The Chronic-Kidney-Disease.net team does not recommend or endorse any products or treatments discussed herein. Learn more about how we maintain editorial integrity here.

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